WWI In Memoriam


Hope and Sons Remembrance

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the commencement of World War One.

While half a world away from the key theatres of this war, the Otago region and peoples none the less made dutiful contribution and ultimately endured painful losses on an unprecedented scale.

 Hope and Sons recognises and respects the determination, courage and sacrifice shown by New Zealand service personnel during the course and aftermath of World War I. We express our gratitude to these service personnel, and acknowledge the resilience of their families.

 The 128 year history of our company is tightly entwined with the experiences of the regions peoples. We continually reflect on our professional and personal roles and relationships in the community – seeking to sustain and develop our practice. A keen awareness of history, and how to trace it, is vital to our practice…    

 We have investigated and made use of several excellent resources to provide understanding and short accounts of the Gallipoli Campaign, and the ANZAC day tradition. We have also researched service archives to honour and give insight into the ‘war stories’ of our WWI servicemen in particular. Their stories resonate richly nearly a century later and have a special meaning for present-day people within the firm.

  

Hope and Son's commemorative flagpole and Chapel, Dunedin

Hope and Son's commemorative flagpole and Chapel, Dunedin

Gallipoli

The Gallipoli or Dardanelles Campaign ("Canakkale Savaslari" in Turkish) took place on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey from 25 April 1915 to 9 January 1916 during World War One.

Winston Churchill committed British, French and - above all - untested Australian and New Zealand forces to the ill-fated campaign to seize control of the Dardanelles and western Turkey. The aim was to force Turkey out of the war, to secure an ice-free sea supply route to Russia, and to open another front against Germany and Austria via Hungary.

The landings began with British and French forces at Cape Helles and the Australian & New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) on the Kabatepe beaches on 25 April 1915. The Allied forces tried to break through the Turkish lines during the early days of the campaign and the Turks tried to drive the allied troops off the peninsula.  

Thousands lost their lives in the Gallipoli campaign: 87,000 Turks, 44,000 men from France and the British Empire, including 8500 Australians. Among the dead were 2721 New Zealanders, almost one in four of those who served on Gallipoli.

In Turkey, the battle is understood as a defining moment in national history - a final surge in the defence of the motherland as the centuries - old Ottoman Empire came to pieces. The struggle laid the grounds for the Turkish War of Independence and the foundation of the Turkish Republic eight years later under Atatürk, himself a commander at Gallipoli. 

In Australia and New Zealand, the campaign was the first major battle undertaken by a joint military formation and is often considered to mark the birth of national consciousness in both of these countries.

 

Gallipoli Peninsula circa 1915

Gallipoli Peninsula circa 1915

ANZAC Day

Anzac Day occurs on 25 April. It commemorates all New Zealanders killed in war and also honours returned servicemen and women.

The date itself marks the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers – the Anzacs – on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915. The aim was to capture the Dardanelles, the gateway to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. At the end of the campaign, Gallipoli was still held by its Turkish defenders.

 It may have led to a military defeat, but for many New Zealanders then and since, the Gallipoli landings meant the beginning of something else – a feeling that New Zealand had a role as a distinct nation, even as it fought on the other side of the world in the name of the British Empire.

 Anzac Day was first marked in 1916. The day has gone through many changes since then. The ceremonies that are held at war memorials up and down New Zealand, or in places overseas where New Zealanders gather, remain rich in the tradition, ritual and detail that befit a military funeral. 

Proceedings are marked by a solemn and sincere atmosphere. The dawn parade, last post, gun salute, tribute, two major parts: one at dawn and another, more public event, later in the morning. Reverence for returned servicemen.

The modern day sees a strong resurgence of interest in Anzac day traditions and ceremony. The proceedings and ritual of each Anzac day recognise and remind us of warfare and its horrors, while the surrounding Anzac phenomena increasingly expands social and historical consiciousness with themes of  honour, remembrance, and gratitude. Centenary events planned for 2015 promote inclusiveness and anticipate mass attendance.  

Dawn Parade 1936, Queens Gardens, Dunedin

Dawn Parade 1936, Queens Gardens, Dunedin

 

The Victory Medal

The Victory Medal

The Military Medal, 1918 as awarded to RH Flavell

The Military Medal, 1918 as awarded to RH Flavell

The Military Cross, 1919 as awarded to Rev C Houchen

The Military Cross, 1919 as awarded to Rev C Houchen


To research a WW1 Soldier Click Here >> NZDF Personnel File Search